Tag Archives: May 6 Committee

Saturday Night Russian Pin-Ups

Natalia Pereverzeva, Russian Miss Earth candidate:

But my Russia—it is also my poor, long-suffering country, mercilessly torn to pieces by greedy, dishonest, unbelieving people.

My Russia—it is a great artery, from which the ‘chosen’ few people are draining away its wealth. My Russia is a beggar. My Russia cannot help her elderly and orphans. From it, bleeding, like from a sinking ship, engineers, doctors, teachers are fleeing, because they have nothing to live on.

When we seriously begin to take care of our country, it will blossom and shine brightly.

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Alexandra Dukhanina, Russian political prisoner:

Alexandra Dukhanina is a 19-year-old woman, an anarchist and a vegetarian. She has been under house arrest without the right to correspondence for nearly six months. Dukhanina was arrested in connection with the so-called mass disturbances on May 6 in Moscow.

To find more about the crackdown against democracy activists in Russia and how you can show your solidarity with Alexandra and others swept up in the Putinist police state’s dragnet, go here or here.

A solidarity demonstration is scheduled for Thursday, November 29, 6 p.m., outside the Russian Embassy in London. More details here and here.

Photo of Alexandra Dukhanina by Rustam Adagamov

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Isabelle Makgoeva, “What Else Have You Learned to Ignore?” (On the Prisoners of May 6)

Isabelle Makgoeva
What Else Have You Learned to Ignore?
July 26, 2012
echo.msk.ru

A few hours ago, we learned of two more arrests in the May 6 case.

Nikolai Kavkazsky, an activist with the Committee for Civil Rights, was met by Moscow police investigators in the stairwell of his building as he was returning home. Kavkazsky’s apartment was searched, and his computer and laptop were confiscated. He was then taken to Petrovka 38 [Moscow police HQ] for questioning, where he remains as of this writing. At the moment, we know that he is a suspect in the Bolotnaya Square case and has been charged with Article 318 of the Criminal Code (violence against a police officer).

The second person arrested is 21-year-old Alexei Polikhovich, who is a student at Russian State Technological University and employed. In his blog, he actively encouraged friends to come to the July 26 rally, not knowing that he would be the next defendant in the Bolotnaya Square case. Alexei is now at Petrovka 38 waiting for his custody hearing. I would like to hope that he would be released on his own recognizance, but, unfortunately, there is a very good chance that the court will treat him as it has eleven other defendants in the case and remand him to a pretrial detention facility for several months.

They usually come at night or early morning. They lie in wait for some on the stairs; in the case of others, they politely ring the doorbell. They often knock out the fuses so that the person goes out into the stairwell, where they can pounce on him. They come with guns, throw people on the floor, yell obscenities, conduct searches and confiscate all electronic devices. Then the interrogations begin, accompanied by insults and threats, and pressure on relatives. The person is then taken in handcuffs to court, where he or she sits like an animal in a cage under the watchful supervision of four riot policeman, sometimes with a dog. The prosecutor has a single answer to any argument made by defense lawyers: the suspect will continue to engage in criminal activity and put pressure on witnesses. Bail is denied, and the suspect gets another four months in jail, in a cell for six.

The worst thing about these detentions is that the powers that be are able to show us how submissive we are. How we can easily accept that people who recently marched with us to Bolotnaya Square hoping to change something are now in jail. Almost no one attends the court hearings or pickets the Investigative Committee. Seven venues (which style themselves as protest-oriented) turned down our request to hold a charity concert in support of the prisoners. The people who seemingly should be leading thousands into the streets to demand freedom for the prisoners do nothing. When a society is so indifferent, maybe nothing needs to be changed? Maybe it deserves the government it has?

I know that if they are convicted and sent to prison, I’ll always feel that I didn’t do everything possible to keep these people free, to ensure that their children didn’t grow up without fathers, to prevent the chemist Fyodor Bakhov‘s career from being destroyed, to keep Mikhail Kosenko alive and well, and make sure Maria Baronova‘s son was not taken from her. And I hope that I’m not the only one who feels this way.

A protest rally will take place today, July 26, at 7:00 p.m. in Pushkin Square [in Moscow]. Protests will be held at the same time in Paris, London, New York, Amsterdam, Israel, Berlin, Cologne, Perm, Kyiv, Penza, Rostov, Kaliningrad, Saint Petersburg and a dozen other cities. Anyone can also go to a Russian embassy or city administration building and express their attitude to the tyranny now unfolding in Russia.

Isabelle Makgoeva is an activist with Occupy Russia and the Russian Socialist Movement, and an organizer with the May 6 Committee. (Photo courtesy of drugoi.)

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Pressure Ratchets Up on Protesters
July 27, 2012
by Natalya Krainova and Jonathan Earle
The Moscow Times

As hundreds of opposition supporters rallied Thursday on behalf of a dozen people arrested in connection with violence at a May 6 demonstration, investigators signaled that the Kremlin was hardening its stance toward the opposition, detaining two more people and searching their homes.

A total of 13 people are now in custody, and three others are under investigation. The suspects include rank-and-file opposition activists together with seemingly random people who, according to relatives and friends, rarely attend rallies and never speak publicly about politics — raising questions about whether the arrests are a warning to the opposition to stay off the streets.

Hundreds of people chanted, “Freedom to political prisoners!” and “Russia Without Putin!” on Thursday evening near Pushkin Square at a City Hall-authorized rally demanding the release of people jailed on charges of participating in violence at the sanctioned opposition rally on Bolotnaya Ploshchad on May 6, the eve of President Vladimir Putin’s inauguration.

Rally organizers said 3,000 people turned out to protest Thursday, while police put the figure at 800, Interfax reported.

At least four people were detained, including three Left Front activists who handed out leaflets urging people to attend a Sept. 15 opposition rally in Moscow. New legislation bans organizers from announcing a rally [without] first notifying the authorities.

Another person, a young man, was detained as he tried to carry a knife, a telescopic baton, and fireworks through a metal detector leading into the cordoned-off rally area, Interfax said.

Among the people who addressed the crowd were Left Front leader Sergei Udaltsov; a suspect in the May 6 case, Maria Baronova; and veteran human rights activist Lev Ponomaryov.

Friends of the latest detainees in the May 6 case, leftist activist Nikolai Kavkazsky and Moscow student Alexei Polikhovich mingled in the crowd.

Kavkazsky is “a good guy, a pacifist and vegetarian,” leftist activist Nikita Yechkov told a reporter. “I don’t believe he would have beaten anyone.”

“They arrest the most peaceful of us,” said a 19-year-old female acquaintance of Polikhovich who refused to give her name.

Rallies were also planned for at least 11 other Russian cities, as well as in London, New York, Paris and Tel Aviv.

The Investigative Committee said in a statement that it would ask a court to sanction the arrest of Kavkazsky and Polikhovich on charges of taking part in the May 6 violence. Investigators also searched their homes and confiscated computers and clothes supposedly worn by the suspects on Bolotnaya Ploshchad.

A Moscow district court ordered that Kavkazsky be held in custody for two months late Thursday, rights activist Eduard Rudyk said by telephone from the courtroom.

More detentions and arrests may follow, investigators said, adding that district police were helping them to identify and trace other suspects.

Kavkazsky, a lawyer in his mid-20s, is an activist with the Left Socialist Action group and the Committee for Civil Rights, while Polikhovich, 21, is a student of Russian State Social University, according to Bolotnoedelo.info, a website opened by opposition supporters.

The rights group Memorial labelled the new detainees political prisoners, senior member Oleg Orlov told Interfax.

Because of the new detentions, Left Front leader Udaltsov cancelled a weekend trip to the pro-Kremlin summer camp at Lake Seliger in the Tver region, where he had planned to present the political opposition’s program. “In the current situation where the authorities are cynically continuing to fill prisons with opposition representatives, I don’t belong at Seliger,” Udaltsov tweeted.

The 16 suspects are aged 18 to 36, while 14 are men, according to Bolotnoyedelo.info and Rosuznik, a project set up by opposition leader Alexei Navalny to help the suspects.

Most are accused of involvement in the May 6 unrest, either with or without using violence against police. Each charge is punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Kavkazsky, in addition to using violence against police, is accused of hooliganism.

At least seven of the suspects are political activists, either leftist, nationalist or environmental. They include: nationalists Rikhard Sobolev and Yaroslav Belousov, both in their early 20s; leftist activist Vladimir Akimenkov; Alexander Kamensky, in his mid-30s, an activist of The Other Russia group led by Eduard Limonov; antifascist Stepan Zimin, in his early 20s; civil activist Maria Baronova, in her late 20s; Alexandra Dukhanina, 18, a civil and environmental activist and Moscow State University student.

The rest, according to public information and accounts from relatives or friends, have no links to political, environmental or rights groups and include: Artyom Savelov, a former metro worker in his early 30s; Oleg Arkhipenkov, general director of a travel agency in his mid-20s; Fyodor Bakhov, department head at an innovations company linked to a research institute; Mikhail Kosenko, an unemployed and mentally disabled person in his mid-30s; Denis Lutskevich, a cultural studies student who is barely 20; Andrei Barabanov, a freelance painter who is also about 20; and Maxim Luzyanin, an entrepreneur and bodybuilder in his mid-30s.

Twelve suspects have been charged, including Sobolev, Akimenkov, Arkhipenkov, Savelov, Bakhov, Kosenko, Zimin, Belousov, Lutskevich, Barabanov, Luzyanin and Dukhanina. Dukhanina is under home arrest, while Kamensky spent 10 days in detention but was unexpectedly released without explanation.

Relatives of several suspects described their loved ones as peaceful by nature and disinterested in politics, saying they had turned up at the rally by accident.

Viktor Savelov, father of former metro worker Artyom Savelov, said his son was a “conflict-free” person and “all his friends were surprised that he had been targeted.” May 6 was the first rally Artyom had ever attended, his father said, adding that his son could not have shouted slogans because he stuttered.

Twenty-five photos of Savelov at the rally that his father found on the Internet showed his son behaving ordinarily and, even when a policeman tried to hit with a baton, he “purposely stood still, his arms at his side,” his father said.

Savelov does physical exercises regularly, and his height is above average.

Alexandra, girlfriend of antifascist activist Stepan Zimin, said her boyfriend was a “gentle, modest and mild” person. Online photos show Zimin is stout, and Rosuznik says he stands 2 meters, 5 centimeters high.

Yekaterina, girlfriend of freelance painter Andrei Barabanov, said her boyfriend never spoke to her about acting “aggressively” toward the police, so he probably hadn’t because they had no secrets from each other. A video that investigators presented as a proof of Barabanov’s guilt was inconclusive, she said.

Maria Troshina, sister of innovations expert Fyodor Bakhov, called him “a good person who would not walk by if he saw the police beating someone.”

Pavel Salin, an analyst with the Center for Current Politics, said that authorities are targeting ordinary people to frighten opposition-minded people within the elite like socialite Ksenia Sobchak, State Duma Deputy Gennady Gudkov, and former Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin.

But Alexei Mukhin, an analyst with the Center for Political Information, said the suspects probably had acted aggressively toward the police and suggested that the police had evidence of their guilt since the arrests occurred weeks after the rally. “Random people are usually caught on the spot,” Mukhin said. “The fact that [some] suspects are not members of any political groups proves the objectivity of the police,” he added.

Police detained more than 400 people on May 6 but all were released within one to 15 days.

Olga Mefodyeva, an analyst with the Center of Political Technologies, said the arrests aimed to show that police are working and are tough on protesters.

Also Thursday, prominent environmentalist Yevgenia Chirikova was summoned by investigators for questioning in connection with the May 6 case, she tweeted.

Meanwhile, investigators refused to return to Sobchak about $1.7 million in cash that they confiscated from her apartment on June 11 as part of an investigation into the May 6 case, Sobchak tweeted. Investigators cited fear that she might “use the money to finance mass disorders,” she said.

Moscow’s Basmanny District Court backed investigators’ request to keep the money as evidence, she said.

On Tuesday, investigators searched the home of Khimki forest activist Pavel Shekhtman in connection with the May 6 case, confiscating computers, discs, modems, notebooks and documents belonging to Fronde-TV, which has covered opposition rallies and has its office in Shekhtman’s apartment, according to the website of Ecooborona, a Moscow region environmental group.

Also Tuesday, investigators questioned Eduard Limonov, leader of the unregistered The Other Russia party, over the May 6 case, asking whether he knew who was behind the mass disorder, Limonov wrote on his blog. Limonov, who wasn’t among the rally’s organizers and didn’t take part in it, said he had no information and was allowed to leave.

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Grani.Ru’s video of yesterday’s solidarity rally in Puskhin Square:

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May 6 Committee: Stop the Crackdown on the Opposition in Russia!

STOP THE CRACKDOWN ON THE OPPOSITION IN RUSSIA!
Call for an International Day of Action on July 26

The protest demonstration that took place on May 6, 2012, in Moscow was one of the most massive and assertive during the past several months. Despite pressure from the authorities and societal depression after Vladimir Putin’s alleged election victory, ten of thousands of people took to the streets of Russia’s capital. The May 6 demonstration showed that the protest wave that rose in December 2011 had not only not subsided, but had taken on a new impetus and a new, more radical and decisive direction.

The most striking outcome of this legal, peaceful march was the harsh detention of more than 600 people. Police assaulted an even greater number of marchers.

The fact that the actions of police were illegal is borne out by a large number of photos, videos, eyewitness accounts, and medical examinations. However, despite numerous appeals by citizens and human rights advocates to the Russian Prosecutor General’s Office, the Russian Investigative Committee and other bodies, not a single criminal case on abuse of power by police officers or obstruction of a legal mass event has been initiated.

On the contrary, the authorities have used the events of May 6 to launch an unprecedented crackdown on the Russian opposition. During May and June, twelve people were arrested as part of an ongoing criminal investigation of the “riots,” and two more people were placed under house arrest. All fourteen people have been charged with organizing and participating in mass riots, and violence against police officers.

Their names are Vladimir Akimenkov, Oleg Arkhipenkov, Andrei Barabanov, Maria Baronova, Fyodor Bakhov, Yaroslav Belousov, Alexandra Dukhanina, Stepan Zimin, Alexander Kamensky, Mikhail Kosenko, Maxim Luzyanin, Denis Lutskevich, Artyom Savyolov and Rikhard Sobolev.

There is no doubt that the authorities are now fabricating the most massive political case in recent years. Thus, according to the Investigative Committee, 160 investigators are working on the case, and more than 1,250 people have been questioned so far. The number of detainees could rise, according to certain sources, to several hundred people.

Only concerted action by thousands of concerned people around the world can stop this from happening!

The May 6 Committee has now been launched in Moscow: this grassroots initiative demands an end to the crackdown and closure of this shameful “criminal case.” The committee’s activists, who represent various human rights, civic and political organizations, are in constant contact with the lawyers of the accused, have launched a public awareness campaign, and are organizing protests against this political crackdown.

We are calling for an International Day of Action on July 26. We appeal to human rights organizations and progressive groups around the world: the fate of dozens of innocent, peaceful protesters, people already in prison or who soon might find themselves there, depends on your solidarity and your active stance. Distribute information about the case, hold rallies and solidarity concerts, picket Russian embassies and consulates in your cities and countries, and send letters and petitions to Russian authorities. The future of the new protest movement in Russia now depends on whether we are able to stop this crackdown by the authorities.

SOLIDARITY IS OUR STRENGTH!

For more information or to contact us:

Telephone: +7 926 305-2823
Web site: www.6may.org
E-mail: help6may@gmail.com
Live Journal blog: 6mayorg.livejournal.com
Facebook: facebook.com/pages/Комитет-6-мая/336195009792710
Vkontakte: vk.com/6mayorg

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