Tag Archives: hunger strike

Kazakhstan: Hands Off Roza Tuletaeva! (solidarity appeal)

campaignkazakhstan.org

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Roza Tuletaeva starts hunger strike as prison regime refuses medical aid

April 24, 2013 

On 22nd April, Roza Tuletaeva, one of the activists from the Zhanaozen oil workers’ strike, started a hunger strike. She has taken this extreme step because she has been refused essential medical aid at the women’s prison colony in Atyrau, where she is currently serving a lengthy jail sentence. She was arrested after the notorious massacre of Zhanaozen oil workers’ by government forces in December 2011 and sentenced to seven years in prison (later reduced to five, on appeal), on the charge of “organising mass disorder.”

According to friends and relatives of Roza, she is suffering from chronic liver disease. The refusal to provide suitable treatment appears to be intentional revenge by the authorities. It is a form of torture against this political prisoner, who refused to accept that she was guilty as charged.

During her court trial, Roza experienced torture and sexual harassment at the hands of the state security police (KNB), and the lives of her children were threatened. Nevertheless, she refused to give evidence against herself and her co-strikers, refused to give evidence against Vladimir Kozlov, leader of the Party Alga (who was later sentenced to a prison sentence), and exposed the methods of the investigators during her trial.

Local human rights organisations have demanded the immediate provision of medical assistance to Roza Tuletaeva and have also demanded the right to visit her to make a proper assessment of her health. Clearly she is in danger, her health is already undermined and now her life is at risk. The hunger strike is eroding her health even further.

Campaign Kazakhstan calls for protest messages against these further attempts at torture, which are organized by government forces with the aim of breaking the will of Roza and her comrades and of anyone else prepared to resist the authorities. By attempting to physically annihilate Roza Tuletaeva, they are trying to scare all oil workers, and those who live in the Mangystau region, from further protest actions.

Hands off Roza Tuletaeva!

Freedom to the arrested oil-workers and political prisoners in Kazakhstan!

Please send urgent protests to the Embassy of Kazakhstan in your country (a list can be found here) and copies to kazakhstansolidarity@gmail.com and campaignkazakhstan@gmail.com.

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Filed under open letters, manifestos, appeals, political repression, trade unions

Release Mahmoud Sarsak from Prison!

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Release Mahmoud Sarsak from Prison

Show Racism the Red Card joins the voices calling for his release

Mahmoud Sarsak, 25, is a Palestinian national team player. He has been imprisoned by the Israeli government for three years without any trial. In desparation, and to protest against his condition and lack of civil liberties, Sarsak is on a hunger strike. The 25-year old footballer has not eaten for 85 days and has lost approximately thirty kilos in weight. According to human rights organisation Addameer the situation of Mahmoud is critical.

On 22 July 2009 Sarsak – who lives in Rafah in the Gaza Strip – was arrested at a checkpoint when he was on his way to the West Bank for a match with his national team. He was interrogated for thirty days and then imprisoned without any trial or a precise legal charge. Family and friends are not allowed to visit him. They do not know why he is being detained for already nearly three years – no charge, no trial.

According to the Israeli government he is an illegal combatant and therefore they can imprison him indefinitely. Israeli jails house around 4,000 Palestinian political prisoners, more than 300 of them “administrative detainees” held without charge or trial. Sarsak, and all victims of abuse by the Israeli state, need our support.

Watch a video interview with Mahmoud’s family

This urgent campaign to release Mahmoud Sarsak is being supported by:

Eric Cantona
Noam Chomsky, Professor MIT, USA
John Dugard, Former Special Rapporteur of UN on Palestine, South Africa
FIFPro
Trevor Griffiths, Writer, UK
Paul Laverty, Screenwriter, UK
Ken Loach, Filmmaker, UK
Miriam Margolyes OBE, Actor, UK
John Pilger, Journalist, author, film maker, Australia
Show Racism the Red Card
Ahdaf Soueif, Writer, UK

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Fight for the Life of Mahmoud Sarsak! (London)

Fight for the Life of Mahmoud Sarsak!

Monday, June 11,  3–5 pm • Department for Culture Media and Sport

2-4 Cockspur Street  London SW1Y 5DH [just behind Trafalgar Square]

As the world watches millionaire footballers compete for the European Championship trophy, Palestinian footballer Mahmoud Sarsak is close to death as he enters his 85th day of hunger strike, the longest in history.

Sarsak, a 25-year-old footballer and student from Gaza, was arrested three years ago as he was trying to meet up with the national team in the West Bank, and has been detained indefinitely without charge or trial ever since.

Come and protest against this blatant abuse of human rights on Monday 11th June at 3pm outside the Department of Media, Culture and Sport in a coordinated action with the We Are All Hana Shalabi Network from Scotland who will be protesting outside the British Consulate in Jerusalem.

Bring footballs, football shirts and banners for a fun media-friendly kickabout outside the DMCS to raise awareness of Sarsak and the thousands of Palestinian prisoners being held under administrative detention and illegal combatant laws.

Please note:
This Facebook event was created because Facebook blocked all new activity on our original Facebook event for this protest.

Clearly it was too effective in gaining rapid growing support, so presumably the Zionist trolls made false allegations and Facebook just blocked it without any notification or investigation. Please follow details and updates also through emails, twitter and phones.

Phone CONTACTS:
+44 (0)7729779164
+44 (0)7880 731 865

Twitter: @palestineplace
Email: najah383@hotmail.com

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Saint Petersburg: The Hunger Artists

Artists’ Hunger-Strike Enters 5th Day
By Sergey Chernov
The St. Petersburg Times
June 2, 2009

 

Despite continued pressure from the authorities, an artists’ hunger strike against the police’s arbitrariness went into its fifth day on Monday. The protesters are demanding the investigation and punishment of those responsible for the May Day mass arrests, when some 300 anarchists, artists and musicians were seized or dispersed by the OMON, preventing them from taking part in an authorized demonstration in St. Petersburg.

IMG_2112Their other demands include launching a federal commission to investigate the activities of the “E” (anti-extremism) Center that is reportedly used to spy on and persecute dissidents and the release of Artyom Loskutov, an artist and activist arrested on drug charges in Novosibirsk last month (the protesters say the drugs were planted).

“We’ll be holding a hunger strike until at least one of these demands is met,” Anastasia Nekoza, one of the protesters, said.

“We appealed to the Prosecutor’s Office, the GUVD (the Interior Ministry Department) and the Human Rights Commission about the May 1 events a little over a week ago, and we’re expecting that some sort of enquiry will begin. We’re aiming at producing an intensifying effect.”

The group of artists, who have been holding the demo since Thursday, have been staying in a public garden in front of the former Smolny Institute, now City Hall’s residence and painting pictures dealing with the police’s unlawful behavior – a helmet-wearing OMON special-task policeman standing on a pedestal in front of City Hall, currently occupied by the Soviet-era Lenin monument; little children scared by the OMON police or a policeman’s boot ready to trample a colorful beetle.

“The paintings reflect the unlawfulness of both the police and the authorities, including the “E” Department, that society can’t control in any way,” Nekoza said.

On Thursday, the artists came to the site with chains, ready to chain themselves up and thereby complicate any possible arrests, but no attempts to detain them were made.

“We thought we’d get arrested at once, we didn’t really expect it to last this long,” Yevgeny Schyotov, one of the protesters, said, adding that they are considering holding an exhibition of the works painted during the hunger strike.

According to Schyotov, the hunger strike was launched by five artists, but a few more joined as time passed, increasing the number to nine. Schyotov was a co-organizer of the thwarted May Day demo and was one of the first arrested by the OMON.

However, some pressure is being applied, according to Nekoza.

“The FSO (the Federal Protection Service) is putting pressure on the policemen who are on guard here to clear out the park, but the policemen can’t find any lawful grounds to do it,” she said.

“But because they’ve been put under pressure by the FSO, they tell us about it and ask us [to leave.] But, they say, ‘If you obey our demands, it’s good, if not, we can’t do anything.”

Novosibirsk artist Loskutov, who has been one of most prominent participants of the “Monsterations” — colorful May Day events featuring artists and musicians, was arrested on May 14 after receiving calls and invitations for a “conversation” from the “E” Center, according to his artist friend Leonid Gegen, who came to St. Petersburg to join the protest.

“When he was returning home from work, several plain-clothed men came to him and pushed him into a car,” Gegen said.

“He was taken to a nearby courtyard where he was searched and the police said they found 11 grams of marijuana. The most strikingly cynical thing about it is that you need to have over 10 grams to be prosecuted.”

According to Gegen, artists in Leipzig, Germany, have launched a foundation in support of Loskutov.

 

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