Daily Archives: November 18, 2011

Rafeef Ziadah: “We Teach Life, Sir”

Rafeef Ziadah, “We Teach Life, Sir”:

Via New Left Project

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The United Russia Guide to Winning Hearts and Minds. Strategy 3: Crash a Protest Demo, Break An Old Man’s Arm, Then Have the Police Arrest Bystanders at Random

Elderly Man Roughed Up as [Protest] Rally Turns to Boos
15 November 2011
The Moscow Times

St. Petersburg resident Nikolai Shkalin, 72, became one of the first real victims of the ongoing parliamentary campaign, sustaining a broken hand at a local rally crashed by a candidate of the ruling party.

Several city media outlets reported that Shkalin was thrown down from the stage by bodyguards of the candidate, Maxim Dolgopolov, during Sunday’s rally, where some 700 residents protested development plans for the district.

video from the scene shows Dolgopolov booed off the stage by protesters — many of them senior citizens — who clapped their hands and chanted “Go away!” and “Off with you!”

Several protesters, all young opposition activists, were detained and face hooliganism charges [Editor’s note: although, as we know for a fact, they had nothing to do with the scuffle], the Neva24 web site said. Shkalin, a co-organizer of the rally, was hospitalized.

Dolgopolov denounced the incident as provocation and said he did not see the attack on Shkalin, which [was] caught on video.

He did not identify the alleged provocateurs, but said in a blog post Monday that he came to tell the locals that the new city governor, Georgy Poltavchenko, had addressed their concerns after Dolgopolov’s lobbying.

No officials commented on the story Monday.

Earlier this month, an alleged United Russia official was booed off stage at a concert of the veteran rock band Mashina Vremeni in Kemerovo. The group later denounced his appearance as provocation.

_____

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re.act.feminism #2 – a performing archive

re.act.feminism #2 –
a performing archive


Ewa Partum, “Selfidentification,” Warsaw 1980.
Photo-montage (from a series of 8 images).
Courtesy: The artist.

re.act.feminism #2
a performing archive
Archive / Exhibitions / Workshops / Performances / Talks / Research
7 October 2011–1 September 2013

First Venue:
7 October 2011–15 January 2012, Centro Cultural Montehermoso Kulturunea, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain

www.reactfeminism.org
re.act.feminism #2 – a performing archive is a continually expanding, mobile and temporary performance archive travelling through six European countries from 2011 to 2013. In its current version, it presents gender-critical, feminist and queer performance art by 125 artists and artists collectives from the 1960s until the beginning of the 1980s, as well as contemporary positions. The research focus is on artworks from Eastern and Western Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East, the US and selected countries in Latin America. On its route through Europe this temporary archive will continue to expand through local research and scholarly cooperation. It will also be “animated” through exhibitions, screenings, performances and discussions along the way, which will continuously contribute to the archive.

With this project, the organiser cross links e.V., Berlin and the curators Bettina Knaup and Beatrice Ellen Stammer draw on the success of the exhibition “re.act.feminism—performance art of the 1960s & 70s today” which was shown to great critical acclaim in the Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Germany, in 2008–2009.

The main goals of the project are to make performance documentation, which is dispersed and often difficult to access, available to a broader public for the first time in such a great volume and variety, and to strengthen cross-generational and trans-cultural dialogue.

The project is based on the idea of a living archive, emphasising the use, appropriation, and re-interpretation of documents: What effect does the performance document have in the moment of its reception, what does it do? What kind of relationship does it create between past and future, between author and recipient?

At Centro Cultural Montehermoso, first venue of the project, the archive will be accompanied by an exhibition presenting 20 artists of different generations, which have been selected from the archive:

EXHIBITION
Oreet Ashery, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Regina José Galindo, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Marta Minujín, Fina Miralles, Lorraine O’Grady, Tanja Ostojić, Letícia Parente, Ewa Partum, Adrian Piper, Ulrike Rosenbach, Raeda Saadeh, Zorka Ságlová, Stefanie Seibold & Teresa María Díaz Nerio, Miriam Sharon, Gabriele Stötzer

ARCHIVE
Helena Almeida, Eleanor Antin, Oreet Ashery, Antonia Baehr, Maja Bajević, Anne Bean, Anat Ben-David, Renate Bertlmann, Pauline Boudry & Renate Lorenz, Nisrine Boukhari, Maris Bustamante, Cabello/Carceller, Graciela Carnevale, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Helen Chadwick, Lygia Clark, Colette, Nieves Correa, Laura Cottingham, Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen, Disband, Ines Doujak, Orshi Drozdik, Yingmei Duan, Diamela Eltit, VALIE EXPORT, Factory of Found Clothes, Esther Ferrer, Rose Finn-Kelcey, Simone Forti, (e.) Twin Gabriel, Regina José Galindo, Rimma Gerlovina & Valeriy Gerlovin, Patrycja German, Ghazel, Kate Gilmore, Mona Hatoum, Sanja Iveković, Elżbieta Jabłońska, Françoise Janicot, Joan Jonas, Anne Jud, Kirsten Justesen, Kanonklubben/Damebilleder, Line Skywalker Karlström, Tina Keane, Amal Kenawy, Verica Kovacevska, Elena Kovylina, Katarzyna Kozyra, Christina Kubisch, Verena Kyselka, Nicola L, Latifa Laâbissi, Leslie Labowitz, Suzanne Lacy, Katalin Ladik, Sigalit Landau, Klara Lidén, Kalup Linzy, Natalia LL, Manon, María Evelia Marmolejo, Muda Mathis, Dóra Maurer, Mónica Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Marta Minujín, Fina Miralles, Linda Montano, Charlotte Moorman, Teresa Murak, Sands Murray-Wassink, Hannah O’Shea, Itziar Okariz, Yoko Ono, ORLAN, Tanja Ostojić, Letícia Parente, Ewa Partum, Jillian Peña, Performance Saga (Andrea Saemann & Katrin Grögel), Howardena Pindell, Polvo de Gallina Negra, Yvonne Rainer, Egle Rakauskaite, Jytte Rex, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martha Rosler, Boryana Rossa, María Ruido, Estíbaliz Sábada, Andrea Saemann, Christine Schlegel, Cornelia Schleime, Carolee Schneemann, Miriam Sharon, Bonnie Ora Sherk, Barbara T. Smith, Cornelia Sollfrank, Spiderwoman Theater, Annie Sprinkle, Gabriele Stötzer, Melati Suryodarmo, Jinoos Taghizadeh, Milica Tomić, Valie Export Society, Cecilia Vicuña, The Waitresses, Faith Wilding, Hannah Wilke, Martha Wilson, Julita Wójcik, Nil Yalter

A bilingual exhibition catalogue, documenting the entire project, will be published in 2013. The project’s content will also be made accessible on our website, which is intended as a research tool and will grow in sync with the ongoing exhibition and archive programme.
www.reactfeminism.org

re.act.feminism #2 – a performing archive
is a project by cross links e.V., curated by Bettina Knaup and Beatrice Ellen Stammer

Research: Kathrin Becker, Eleanora Fabião

Organised in cooperation with
Centro Cultural Montehermoso Kulturunea, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
Instytut Sztuki Wyspa, Gdansk, Poland
Galerija Miroslav Kraljević, Zagreb, Croatia
Museet for Samtidskunst, Roskilde, Denmark
Tallinna Kunstihoone, Tallinn, Estonia
Fundació Antoni Tàpies, Barcelona, Spain
Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Germany

The project is funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation and ERSTE Stiftung.
Additional support from cine plus, Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.)

For further information please contact:
artpress – Ute Weingarten | Elisabethkirchstr. 15 | 10115 Berlin
Phone: +49-(0)30-21 96 18 43 | Email: artpress@uteweingarten.de
or info@reactfeminism.org
www.artpress-uteweingarten.de

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Occupy London: The Bank of Ideas

http://occupylsx.org/?p=1229

Occupy London ‘repossesses’ multi-million pound bank offices

– First building for the economic justice campaigners as they occupy third space in borough of Hackney, alongside existing spaces in the City of London and borough of Islington
– New ‘Bank of Ideas’ open to public this Saturday. Offices and meeting rooms will be available for those that have lost their nurseries, community centres and youth clubs due to savage Government spending cuts

Occupy London has taken over a huge abandoned office block in the borough of Hackney belonging to the investment bank UBS in a move it describes as a ‘public repossession.’ [1]

Overnight on Thursday, a dozen activists from the Occupy London, campaigners for social and economic justice as part of the global fight for real democracy, gained access to the building and secured it, giving them a legal claim on the space.

The multimillion pound complex, which has been empty for several years, is the group’s third space and its first building, adding to its two camps at St Paul’s Courtyard – near the London Stock Exchange in the heart of the City – and at Finsbury Square (borough of Islington).

Occupy London supporters Jack Holburn said: “Whilst over 9,000 families were kicked out of their homes in the last three months for failing to keep up mortgage payments – mostly due to the recession caused by the banks – UBS and others financial giants are sitting on massive abandoned properties.

“As banks repossess families’ homes, empty bank property needs to be repossessed by the public. Yesterday we learned that the Government has failed to create public value out of banking failure. We can do better. We hope this is the first in a wave of ‘public repossessions’ of property belonging to the companies that crashed the global economy.”

The Bank of Ideas
The group say the space will be reopened on Saturday morning as the ‘Bank of Ideas.’ [2] An events programme is being lined up, including talks from Palestinian activists, comedy from Josie Long and a session led by trader Alessio Rastani, who sent shockwaves through the media following a provocative interview on the Eurozone crisis. [3]

Sarah Layler of Occupy London added: “The Bank of Ideas will host a full events programme where people will be able to trade in creativity rather than cash. We will also make space available for those that have lost their nurseries, community centres and youth clubs to savage Government spending cuts.”

The Bank of Ideas is a non-residential occupation – so visitors are asked not to bring their sleeping bags. Space will be free from drugs and alcohol from the start, as per Occupy London’s safer space policy.[4]

Notes

[1] The complex is owned by Sun Street Properties Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of UBS. The property includes 5-29 Sun Street, 5-17 Crown Place, 8-16 Earl Street and 54 Wilson Street. See dl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/ubs…http://dl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/shoreditch-ubs.PDFdl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/pla…http://dl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/os-map.pdf and dl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/lan…

[2] www.bankofideas.org.uk

[3] www.youtube.com/watch?v=aC19fEqR5bA

[4] occupylsx.org/?page_id=1214

[5] UBS Bank, which describes itself as a ‘premier global financial services firm offering wealth management, investment banking, asset management and business banking services’ was the subject of a $60bn bailout from the Swiss government in 2008 after piling up the biggest losses of any European lender from the global credit crisis. Since the time, the bank has cut thousands of jobs.

In September, a 31-year old trader at UBS was arrested by City of London police in connection with rogue trading that has cost the bank an estimated $2bn. The New York Times wrote an article in response called ‘At UBS, It’s the Culture That’s Rogue’ (see www.nytimes.com/2011/09/24/business/glo…? pagewanted=all)

The Financial Mail ran the headline ‘UBS grabs £1bn from pensioners’ with reference to a controversial form of secured lending that was sold aggressively to pensioners (seedl.dropbox.com/u/136370/bankofideas/ubs….)

The bank has nine offices in the UK including three in London.

A recent report showed a total of 9,200 homes in the UK were repossessed by banks in the third quarter of the year, a rise on the previous three months (see www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15672123). Figures are expected to deteriorate further.

[6] Nearest tubes for the Occupy London Stock Exchange (OccupyLSX) site are St. Pauls, Mansion House and Canon Street; buses 4, 11, 15, 23, 25, 26, 100, 242; do check Transport For London website for delays and closures. The new Bank of Ideas is just down the road from the Occupy London Finsbury Square (OccupyLFS) space, which is near Moorgate; buses 141, 153, 205, 21, 214, 43

[7] On Sunday 16th October at an assembly of over 500 people on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral, Occupy London collectively agreed the initial statement below. Please note, like all forms of direct democracy, the statement will always be a work in progress. Details at occupylsx.org/?page_id=575

[8] Bringing together a diverse range of people, Occupy London’s Stock Exchange, Finsbury Square (OccupyLFS) and Bank of Ideas are part of more than 30 occupations happening in towns and cities across the UK and over 1,000 actions worldwide coming together under the banner of “United For Global Change” calling for true democracy. Occupy London is supported by groups including UK Uncut, the London-based Assembly of the Spanish 15M movement and many others. It has already received phenomenal interest, from the public and media in the UK and around the world, with the OccupyLSX facebook group now more than 31,000 members.

[9] More information on UK occupations at www.occupybritain.co.uk/protest-details

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The Future Lasts Forever (Gävle Konstcentrum and Iaspis, Sweden)


The Future Lasts Forever / Gävle Konstcentrum and Iaspis
Adriana Lara, Banana Peel, 2008*
The Future Lasts Forever / Gävle Konstcentrum and Iaspis
www.gavlekonstcentrum.se/content/view/37/176/lang,en

The Future Lasts Forever is a book and exhibition project initiated by artists Runo Lagomarsino and Carlos Motta featuring contributions by 21 artists, collectives, and writers who reflect about “the future of Latin America.”

November 19, 2011, 3 pm at Gävle Konstcentrum
Book Release and Exhibition Opening

Presentation of the project by Carlos Motta and Runo Lagomarsino
Lecture by Miguel López, Red Conceptualismos del Sur
Moderator: Lisa Rosendahl, Director, Iaspis

Gävle Konstcentrum
Kungsbäcksvägen 32, BOX 857, 801 31, Gävle, Sweden
www.gavlekonstcentrum.se
konstcentrum@gavle.se

What is the future of Latin America?

When thinking about the making of a future, of an idea of futurity, we must think of what kind of historical lenses we shall employ. The future is inevitably tied to the past and it is defined by the present. The past has been created by ghosts that have determined the present; as specters they manifest in the present as agents of influence. Is there a productive mechanism to free ourselves from this kind of historical determination? What is the role of memory and history in this process? What is the role of artists in imagining a society of the future?

The Book

The Future Lasts Forever compiles newly commissioned essays and projects by a group of Latin American artists and thinkers, who have been assigned the task of reflecting on “the future of Latin America.” The ideas conceived challenge traditional expectations about what the future will bring. The texts and projects in this publication also attempt to transcend stereotypical representations of Latin America, to reflect about our relationship to historical narratives, and to recognize the importance of the actions carried through in the present

With contributions by: Alexander Apóstol, Beta-Local with Juan López Bauza and Luis Pérez, Giuseppe Campuzano, Carlos Capelán, Isabel García Pérez de Arce, Marianna Garín and Roberto Jacoby, Inti Guerrero, Runo Lagomarsino, Walter Mignolo, Carlos Motta, Mujeres Creando, Juan Velentini and Carla Zaccagnini.

Download a free PDF of the book here
www.gavlekonstcentrum.se/content/view/37/176/lang,en

The Exhibition

The Future Lasts Forever is also an exhibition presented at Gävle Konstcentrum in Sweden (November 19, 2011– March 4, 2012), featuring works by Allora & Calzadilla, Francis Alÿs, Carlos Bunga, Mariana Castillo Deball, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Carlos Garaicoa, Antoni Muntadas, Adriana Lara and Wilfredo Prieto.

The Future Lasts Forever is published in collaboration between Iaspis and Gävle Konstcentrum. A series of lectures and workshops will take place during the winter 2011­–2012.

*Image above courtesy of the artist. Photo by Pablo León de la Barra.

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New York, New York

Casey Neistat, “The Raid on Zuccotti Park”:

 

Via Common Dreams

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