Daily Archives: September 18, 2011

The Kandahar Boys

I quoted Robert Fisk’s conclusion that the horrendous crime of 9/11 was committed with “wickedness and awesome cruelty”—an accurate judgment. The crimes could have been even worse. Suppose that Flight 93, downed by courageous passengers in Pennsylvania, had bombed the White House, killing the president. Suppose that the perpetrators of the crime planned to, and did, impose a military dictatorship that killed thousands and tortured tens of thousands. Suppose the new dictatorship established, with the support of the criminals, an international terror center that helped impose similar torture-and-terror states elsewhere, and, as icing on the cake, brought in a team of economists—call them “the Kandahar boys”—who quickly drove the economy into one of the worst depressions in its history. That, plainly, would have been a lot worse than 9/11.

As we all should know, this is not a thought experiment. It happened. I am, of course, referring to what in Latin America is often called “the first 9/11”: September 11, 1973, when the United States succeeded in its intensive efforts to overthrow the democratic government of Salvador Allende in Chile with a military coup that placed General Pinochet’s ghastly regime in office. The dictatorship then installed the Chicago Boys—economists trained at the University of Chicago—to reshape Chile’s economy. Consider the economic destruction, the torture and kidnappings, and multiply the numbers killed by 25 to yield per capita equivalents, and you will see just how much more devastating the first 9/11 was.

Noam Chomsky, “The Responsibility of Intellectuals, Redux: Using Privilege to Challenge the State”

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I Will Never Talk about the War Again (Stockholm)

Chto Delat, Partisan Songspiel

I Will Never Talk About the War Again
Psychosis, Part 1
September 17 – November 19, 2011

Färgfabriken (Stockholm) • www.fargfabriken.se

The show is part of Färgfabriken’s global project Psychosis.

Artists: Marina Abramović, Lana Čmajčanin, Chto Delat, Igor Grubić, Živko Grozdanić Gera, Adela Jušić, Nikolay Oleynikov, Shadow Museum, Alma Suljević, Jaroslav Supek
Curator: Vladan Jeremić

I Will Never Talk About the War Again* relates the condition of society with personal experience. Presented artists are related to the Balkans and deal with testimonies of trauma or collective psychosis of the traumatic post-war society, yet try to avoid stereotypes or to exoticize.

Based on the situation in the Balkans today, we want to illustrate the relationship between individual and society. Many people in the former Yugoslavia suffer from traumatic experiences from the war in the 90s. Nationalism, homophobia, xenophobia or non-tolerance toward any different social group can be seen as complex post-war syndromes and are the hard-core reality of such societies. The situation in the Balkans also reflects what is happening in many other places in the world today.

This fall’s major exhibition at Färgfabriken is the first part of a long-term commitment called Psychosis. A global project intended to illuminate the human psyche, both from an individual and collective perspective. In a series of events, we will deal with aspects of the project theme. It touches on areas such as political extremism, alternative social structures or  human perception. We are interested in how these phenomena are expressed and interpreted in art, literature and science.

Subsequent events and themes within the Psychosis project will take place over a long period, through exhibitions, publications, screenings, seminars, or combinations thereof.

*The exhibition title is taken from a video performance of the same name by two of the participating artists, Lana Čmajčanin and Adela Jušić.

Färgfabriken
Lövholmsbrinken 1
SE 117 43 Stockholm
Subway: Liljeholmen
Tram: Trekanten

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